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Argumentative Essay Outline

Updated: Feb 1, 2017
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What Is an Argumentative Essay

 

An argumentative essay is a type of essay, which centers on a narrowed, asserted thesis statement that argues for one side of a debatable issue. It’s very similar to the persuasive and five-paragraph essays because it involves the student-writer ultimately making a point, an argument – hence the name of the essay type – they will be defending throughout their essay.

 



ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY FORMAT

 

HOW TO WRITE AN ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY

 


 

During the process of writing their assignment, the student-writer should, after brainstorming ideas for their essay, create an extensive outline. This helps them accomplish their objective of writing an essay that asserts a solid argument because they can then use it as a guide when writing their first draft. It’s a much better strategy as opposed to just writing aimlessly, which will usually always take more time and invite more troubles and challenges in the long run than needed.

 

Argumentative Essay Outline


Argumentative Essay Outline


I. Introductory Paragraph

A. Includes a topic sentence that will ease the reader into the essay and establish and narrow the focus for the rest of the essay.



B. THESIS STATEMENT – the argument the essay will be making, from start to finish. In the case of the Argumentative Essay, the student-writer makes a case for one side of an issue. For example: Everyday citizens should not be allowed to carry guns without a permit.

 

C. Three main points defending, supporting and substantiating the Thesis Statement, or the Argumentative Essay’s purpose or main argument. Each of the following body paragraphs will expound on these three main points, one by one.


II. First Body Paragraph

A. A transitional phrase – introduces the reader to the first point that will be
expounded on that will serve to uphold the essay’s main argument – such as First of all, To start off, Firstly.

 

B. The first bit of evidence that defends the original argument, with a logical explanation as to how the point being made upholds the essay’s argument, the essay’s Thesis Statement first declared in the Introduction Paragraph.


III. Second Body Paragraph

A. A transitional phrase – introduces the reader to the second point that will be expounded on that will serve to uphold the essay’s main argument – such as Next, Subsequently, Also, Secondly, Then.

 

B. The second bit of evidence that supports the argument, with a logical explanation as to how the point being made upholds the essay’s original Thesis Statement.


IV. Third Body Paragraph

A. A transitional phrase – introduces the reader to the third and final point that defends the essay’s main argument – such as Lastly, Thirdly, Also, Finally.

 

B. The last bit of evidence that supports the essay’s argument, once again with a logical explanation as to how the point being made upholds the essay’s original Thesis Statement first stated in the introduction paragraph.


V. Conclusion Paragraph

A. A conclusion on the essay’s main argument, the point it sought to argue, the argument it comprehensively defended.

 

B. A restatement of the original Thesis, but in a different way than stated in the introduction paragraph, as well as an enumeration of the main points that supported it and legitimized it.

 

C. It may be beneficial to the student-writer if they conclude their essay with a few questions for their reader, ones that may offer a bit more perspective on the argument they just made and why it is important to consider.

 



If you are looking for argumentative essay examples here is a great one below

ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY EXAMPLE

 


 

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